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College of Graduate Health Studies: Health Administration

Resources for DNP students | A.T. Still University - College of Graduate Health Studies

From the Program Chair

From the ChairRobert Clegg Profile Picture

The United States healthcare system accounts for over $4 trillion in yearly expenditures, which is almost 20% of the U.S. gross domestic product  (GDP). By the year 2030, as America’s Baby Boomers enter their 70s and 80s, it is estimated that health spending will top $16 trillion, or 32 percent of GDP. Because of this spending, the primary focus of our healthcare system is no longer on care provided at the point-of-service, which has been traditionally the case over the past few decades. Rather, healthcare requires a much broader perspective … one that focuses on health promotion, population health, and an evidence-based, best practice approach toward achieving better health outcomes. For this reason, there is a growing need for well-educated, highly-trained healthcare administrators who will take the reins and move the current healthcare system as we know it to the next level.

Healthcare administrators will usually work as either a generalist, where they manage entire facilities, or as a specialist where they will oversee a specific department, such as human resources; accounting; information technology; or a clinical setting, such as nursing, surgery, or physical and occupational therapy. It is not uncommon that an effective healthcare administrator is capable of multitasking and tackling many different responsibilities simultaneously. This is in large part because of the nature of healthcare, as it is very diverse and ever-changing due to the various levels of regulations, policies, and laws that are currently in place. Most often, the duties of a healthcare administrator include, but are not limited to, the recruitment and retention of qualified employees; ensuring that individual departments run smoothly; information is disseminated efficiently throughout the organization; resources are used effectively; and specific operational, strategic, and financial outcomes are reached.  

The Health Administration program at A.T. Still University’s College of Graduate Health Studies is committed to healthcare management that places emphasis on patient-centered care based on our more than 118-year experience in holistic health and our concern for the total patient. For this reason, I am confident that this program will provide you with the foundation necessary to meet the responsibilities required of an effective administrator in today’s ever-changing healthcare environment.

Robert Clegg, PhD, MPH, MCHES
Chair, Health Administration Programs
robertclegg@atsu.org 

Health Administration Team

 

Robert Clegg, PhD, MPH, MCHES
Chair, Health Administration Programs
660.626.2861
robertclegg@atsu.edu
 
Tanya Armistead, Academic Advisor and Dissertation Support
480.265.8092
 

Master's of Health Administration (MHA) Mission, Vision, & Values

MHA Mission

Our mission is to engage with diverse online students to prepare them for leadership roles in health care administration.

Our curriculum is designed for early to mid-career health care professionals who aspire to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to become leaders in the ever changing health care industry. Emphasis is placed on competency-based education, the osteopathic tradition of whole person health care, and the ATSU focus of serving underserved populations. This is accomplished with practice-integrated learning assessments that promote active learning and discourse.
Graduates are prepared for early-to-mid-careerist positions in a variety of health care organizations including hospitals, outpatient centers, physician offices, and other health care-related organizations. They serve in a number of leadership roles including policy, clinical, and operations.

Our scholar-practitioner faculty are educated and experienced in their fields of expertise, and through service, scholarship, and professional development stay attuned to emerging trends in health care, education, and online teaching. They actively engage with students through web conferencing, telephone, and other technologies.

MHA Values

Leadership – We value modeling and mentoring strong leadership skills and inspire individual and program accountability and excellence.
Integrity – We value strong ethical principles and fairness in our individual actions and our program decision making.
Diversity – We value the ideas and beliefs of all of our stakeholders, and work to foster an inclusive environment that respects the dignity of all.
Innovation – We value creative approaches to teaching, learning, and application.
Lifelong Learning – We value the continual pursuit of knowledge that enhances the personal and professional development of all stakeholders.

MHA Program Vision

The ATSU Health Administration program will be recognized as the leading innovator in learner-centered online health administration education, with students, alumni, faculty, and administration working together to prepare students to lead health care organizations and contribute to the overall wellbeing of the population.

MHA Program Objectives

The ATSU Health Administration program will be recognized as the leading innovator in learner-centered online health administration education, with students, alumni, faculty, and administration working together to prepare students to lead health care organizations and contribute to the overall wellbeing of the population.

Goal 1: Recruit and retain a student body representative of the nation’s racial, ethnic, and gender composition.
  • Objective 1.1: The MHA program will exhibit at 1 conference each fiscal year.
  • Objective 1.2: 80% of all students will be retained during an academic year.
  • Objective 1.3: 70% of students will graduate within five years of matriculation.
  • Objective 1.4: 25% of students will be an underrepresented minority.
  • Objective 1.5: 50% of students will be female.
Goal 2: Provide a challenging learning environment that facilitates scholarship of application, integration, and discovery.
  • Objective 2.1: 80% of students will report they gained practical knowledge from a course.
  • Objective 2.2: 95% of faculty members will report the MHA curriculum is rigorous enough for the level of the academic degree.
  • Objective 2.3: 80% of students will demonstrate sufficient proficiency to earn a grade of A or B in every course.
Goal 3: Provide instruction responsive to the needs of the health administration workforce.
  • Objective 3.1: At least one currently-employed health administrator will be a representative on the MHA program Advisory Committee.
  • Objective 3.2: At least one currently-employed health administrator will be a representative on the MHA Curriculum Committee.
  • Objective 3.3: Of the students who complete the graduate culminating project, 90% will achieve a grade of 90% or greater on the project
  • Objective 3.4: Of the students who graduate from the MHA program, 90% will achieve an “excellent” or “good” rating on each of the program’s competencies.
  • Objective 3.5: 80% of respondents to the alumni survey will report the MHA curriculum prepared them for the health administration workforce.
Goal 4: Provide a quality, diverse faculty and staff committed to life-long learning.
  • Objective 4.1: 100% of full-time faculty members will have or be working toward earned doctoral degrees.
  • Objective 4.2: 90% of academically or professionally qualified adjunct faculty members will currently work or previously worked primarily in health administration or a health administration-related field.
  • Objective 4.3: All MHA full-time faculty members will participate in one continuous improvement or professional development activity each year.
  • Objective 4.4: 50% of MHA full-time faculty members will be female.
  • Objective 4.5: 30% of MHA full-time faculty members will be of a race other than Caucasian.
  • Objective 4.6: 75% of MHA staff members will be female.
  • Objective 4.7.: 15% of MHA staff members will be of a race other than Caucasian.
Goal 5: Engage faculty and students in scholarly research to advance health administration learning, teaching, and practice.
  • Objective 5.1: The MHA program full-time faculty will generate scholarly activity resulting in 2 professional or scholarly presentations annually.
  • Objective 5.2: The MHA program full-time faculty will generate scholarly activity resulting in 2 submissions to peer-reviewed publications annually.
  • Objective 5.3: The MHA program faculty will generate scholarly activity involving students as researchers resulting in 1 submission to a peer-reviewed publication and/or 1 scholarly presentation annually.
Goal 6: Provide service to the health administration community in practice, teaching, and research.
  • Objective 6.1: 100% of MHA full-time faculty will maintain membership in the American College of Healthcare Executives.
  • Objective 6.2: 30% of MHA full-time faculty will maintain membership in at least 1 committee serving the American College of Healthcare Executives, either nationally or locally.
  • Objective 6.3: 50% of MHA full time faculty will participate in at least 1 community service activity annually.
  • Objective 6.4: 50% of MHA full time faculty will maintain membership in the Academy of Management’s health care group.
  • Objective 6.5: 30% of MHA full time faculty will provide service to the Academy of Management.
  • Objective 6.6: The MHA program will retain membership in the Higher Education Network of the American College of Health Care Executives.
  • Objective 6.7: The MHA program will retain membership in the Association of University Programs in Health Administration.
  • Objective 6.8: The MHA program will host a chapter of the Upsilon Phi Delta honor society of AUPHA.
  • Objective 6.9: The MHA program will continue to pursue accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Health Management Education (CAHME).   
Goal 7: Provide service to A.T. Still University and the College of Graduate Health Studies.
  • Objective 7.1: 100% of full-time faculty will provide service to University level committees, such as the ad hoc alternate track faculty committee, the Faculty Senate, assessment committees, etc.
  • Objective 7.2: 100% of full-time faculty will provide service to College level committees, including the Faculty Council and its committees, Curriculum Committees, Admission Committees, Faculty Hiring Committee, etc.

MHA Program Competencies

The Commission of Accreditation of Health Management Education (CAHME) requires that programs create the curriculum around a set of core competencies. The College of Graduate Health Studies' Master of Health Administration program uses a modified version of the National Center for Healthcare Leadership (NCHL) competency model 3.0. The program strives to cultivate and strengthen students' accomplishment of these competencies through learning activities and assessments in each course.

Student Service/Accomplishments

Use this form to help us keep track of your community service activities, accomplishments, publications, presentations, etc.

Doctorate of Health Administration Purpose, Vision, Values

DHA Program Purpose

The purpose of the ATSU Doctor of Health Administration program is to advance practice and research in the field of health administration by offering executive-level online courses that develop students’ critical and innovative thinking. Students pursue health administration research projects aimed at expanding knowledge of the field and designed to develop their skills in conducting independent and ethical research. As scholar-practitioners, faculty maintain research agendas that contribute to health administration practice while also serving students in supportive mentoring relationships.

DHA Vision

The ATSU Doctor of Health Administration program will be the ultimate choice of students based on its national reputation for quality education, superior graduate accomplishments, and recognition of faculty and students for their scholarly activity and social impact.

DHA Values

Leadership – We value modeling and mentoring strong leadership skills and inspire individual and program accountability and excellence.
Integrity – We value strong ethical principles and fairness in our individual actions and our program decision making.
Diversity – We value the ideas and beliefs of all of our stakeholders, and work to foster an inclusive environment that respects the dignity of all.
Innovation – We value creative approaches to teaching, learning, and application.
Lifelong Learning – We value the continual pursuit of knowledge that enhances the personal and professional development of all stakeholders.
Scholarship and Practice – We value evidence-based health administration practice.